News Archive: 2010

Pages

Dust ball vacuum cleaner concept

Most of the floor cleaning robots we cover here were designed for household use only. They cannot clean large public areas like airport waiting areas or large offices. To find a solution, Dave Hakkens, a designer from the Netherlands took a totally different approach. Why not make the vacuum cleaner a ball that can roll or be kicked around while sucking up dust from the ground. Rolling is initiated by weight redistribution inside the ball, while suction is put to the ground through the pores of the ball.

Medication dispensing and delivering robot from Panasonic

Another robot winning an award of the Fourth Robot Awards ceremony was Panasonic's new medication dispensing and delivery robots. The system consists of two separate parts. A fixed cabinet like robot is in charge to distribute the fragile ampules into separate trays for delivery, while the autonomous HOSPI is doing the delivery part. The goal is to provide help in hospitals where nursing labor is scarce. The new robot has an extra small footprint, and suitable for 200-400 bed hospitals.

Strawberry picking robotized

Although most of us pick our strawberries from the grocery store shelves, industrial robotics have arrived to the rather labor intensive fruit picking business. This new robot got the Excellence Award in Service Robot category at the Fourth Robot Awards ceremony in Japan. The robot moves along the strawberry plants and finds the ripe fruits with its cameras. The fruit's exact position is determined using a stereoscopic camera. The robot handles the strawberries by their stalks, so the fruit is not damaged during the process. Ripeness of the fruit is also checked before picking.

Dancing Roombas

Who said that Roombas can only go in a random fashion? With some clever hacking they can dance together following a previously determined choreography. The little video below was recorded at a festival in Hungary where iRobot had a booth to display cleaning robots. Five of them do some kind of line dancing while another group of two perform Viennese Waltz.

LG leads Korean market for seven months in a row

According to a Korean press release, LG maintained its leading position in the floor cleaning robot market in South Korea for seven consecutive months. Thanks to the aggressive marketing activities, brand awareness has grown from 30% in January to 69% in September. LG's market share on the robotic vacuum cleaning market was 49.1% in this September, what is more than twice as much as it was last year. LG shares this market with Samsung, iClebo and a few other, smaller brands in Korea.

Husqvarna Automower 305 leaks on YouTube

Not officially announced, but videos are already available about it on YouTube. This is the Husqvarna Automower 305, the first model of Husqvarna's third generation of robotic lawn mowers. As with leaked information it is usual, exact specs are scarce, but the descriptions below the videos say that the robot is equipped with a lithium-ion battery and is suitable for lawns up to 500 m2. The design of the robot seems to be radically different from the current lineup, and as it is shown on the video the robot turns around to back into the docking station.

MSI sells robot under Funrobot iCleaner name

MSI has decided to re-brand their domestic robot product line. The robots announced in June 2010 at Computex are now sold as Funrobot iCleaner robots. So far two of the three robots on display at the show have made it to production. The ultra slim Funrobot iCleaner R500 is only 5 cm high, and designed to clean one room at a time. It has no scheduling option and does not have docking station either. The Funrobot iCleaner M800 is a bit more advanced with 6 ultrasonic range finders and a docking station.

iRobot Celestial Navigation System

Guys at Robot Stock News have discovered a patent that was originally filed in 2004 by iRobot, and describes an indoor navigation system, similar to Mint's NortStar. The patent filing was updated several times during the years, and it was published in April 27, 2010. The system uses a stationary signal emitting device and a signal receiving unit built into the robot. By using the signals the robot is able to determine its relative position in the working area.

Evolution Robotics dispatches first batch of Mint

Evolution Robotics has announced today that they shipped the first batches of Mint robots to selected retailer. Among these retailers we can find Amazon.com, Frontgate, Hammacher Schlemmer, Home Shopping Network, RobotShop.com and SkyMall. National retail chains in the US will start selling Mint later this year. Mint is a new kind of floor cleaning robot that uses an attached cloth to mop the floor.

Windoro announced at IFA 2010

Pohang Institute of Intelligent Robotics (PIRO) has demonstrated the world's first window cleaning robot in IFA 2010, in Berlin. The square shape robot consists of two parts that go to the two sides of the window. The parts are held together by electro magnets and can work up to 25 mm thickness. The robot is equipped with all the necessary sensors to measure distances, avoid or if not possible detect collisions. Windoro cleans the windows in a systematic manner, and returns to its original position when done.

Pages

News Archive

  • 2018:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
  • 2017:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2016:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2015:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2014:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2013:
  • 2012:
  • 2011:
  • 2010:
  • 2009:
  • 2008:
  • 2007:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2006:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2005:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2004:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
  • 2003:
    • Jan
    • Feb
    • Mar
    • Apr
    • May
    • Jun
    • Jul
    • Aug
    • Sep
    • Oct
    • Nov
    • Dec
Subscribe to RobotBG.com